Crib Mattress For Acid Reflux

🔥+ Crib Mattress For Acid Reflux 07 Jul 2020 Laryngopharyngeal reflux is defined as the reflux of gastric content into larynx and ... LPR may be manifested as laryngeal symptoms such as cough, sore throat, ...

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Q: I take the following medications. Nexium, Toporol, Diovan HCT, and Metformin. Do any of these cause weight gain?

A: Weight gain is a rare side effect of Nexium, occurring in less than 1 percent of patients for 1 last update 07 Jul 2020 who take it. The other medications you listed do not appear to cause weight gain, according to their prescribing information. If you are noticing a sudden weight change, it is best to consult your physician.A: Weight gain is a rare side effect of Nexium, occurring in less than 1 percent of patients who take it. The other medications you listed do not appear to cause weight gain, according to their prescribing information. If you are noticing a sudden weight change, it is best to consult your physician.

Q: Does Nexium cause weight gain?

A: According to the package insert for Nexium, weight gain and weight loss are both listed as a possible or probable side effect occurring in less than 1 percent of patients. There may be many factors that can contribute to weight gain, it is important to consult with your physician or health care provider about any specific questions regarding your medical conditions or medications; particularly before taking any action. To learn about GERD or digestive health on Everyday Health''s important to consult with your physician or health care provider about any specific questions regarding your medical conditions or medications; particularly before taking any action. Learn more about GERD or digestive health at Everyday Health here: //www.everydayhealth.com/gerd/guide/ //www.everydayhealth.com/news/common-digestive-conditions-from-top-bottom/

Q: Is there a generic version of Nexium?

A: While every medication on the market has an active ingredient name, as in this case, esomeprazole, it is usually only available as the brand until the patent rights have expired. In this case, Nexium is not available as a generic yet. There are other, less expensive medications on the market, such as Prilosec, Prevacid, and Protonix, as an alternative.

Q: My insurance will not cover Nexium. What is the best replacement?

A: Unfortunately, this question does not have a simple answer. The appropriate answer to your question involves many things. Firstly, you may want to contact your insurance company, prior to speaking with your doctor, and request a formulary. A formulary is a list of the medications they prefer and the different levels of coverage specific to your plan. Then it is important to contact your healthcare provider and based on your individual needs and the formulary list of covered medications, the best treatment option can be determined.

Q: I've been considering getting my prescription for Nexium from a Canadian pharmacy instead of the provider that my insurance requires me to. The difference in cost is about $100 per month and I am tired of over paying. Are there reputable pharmacies that can be trusted in Canada or is this a risky situation that I should stay away from? I would appreciate your input. My wife and I are on an HSA type of plan and we pay over $400 every three months for my 40mg Nexium.

A: The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) states the following about buying medications outside the United States. Medicine purchased over the Internet from foreign sources, from storefront businesses that offer to buy foreign medicine, or during trips outside the United States, may not be safe or effective. These medicines may present health risks and the FDA cannot ensure the safety of medicine from these sources. The FDA cannot help if problems arise with medicine that is obtained from outside U.S. regulation and oversight. The FDA states that if people purchase drugs outside of the U.S., they are taking a risk. The following problems could be associated with medications purchased outside the U.S.: The medication may not have been made under quality assurance procedures designed to produce a safe and effective product, the medication could be a counterfeit which is unsafe or even completely ineffective, the medication could have untested substances and be dangerous, the medicine''t necessarily mean that it cannot happen. You generally shouldn''s (FDA) specifications. The FDA also requires that generic drugs be bioequivalent to their brand-name counterparts. This means that a generic drug will work the same way in your body as the brand-name medication. Generics are considered by the FDA to be identical to brand-name drugs in dose, strength, route of administration, safety, efficacy, and intended use. Currently there is not a generic version of Nexium available. The price of a medication, like Nexium, can vary depending on the wholesaler and pharmacy from which the medication is acquired. Pharmacies sell medication to consumers at a price that includes the cost for acquiring the drug from the wholesaler, plus a retail markup. If a third-party payer (for example, a health insurance company or Medicare) is providing coverage for a medication, such as Nexium, they determine the final cost of the product. Costs will vary from one plan to another, and the payer may cover or reimburse part or all of the cost. In addition to Nexium, Aciphex (rabeprazole), Kapidex (dexlansoprazole), Nexium (esomeprazole), Prevacid (lansoprazole), Prilosec (omeprazole), and Protonix (pantoprazole) belong to the proton pump inhibitor drug class. Studies show that, in general, proton pump inhibitors are about equally effective. Moreover, in general, there is little scientific evidence that there are any important differences in the safety of the proton pump inhibitors. As such, many third-party payers promote

Q: Can Nexium cause aches and pains after long term use?

A: Nexium (esomeprazole) belongs to a class of medications called Proton-Pump Inhibitors. Nexium decreases the amount of acid that is in the stomach and relieves heartburn that is caused by backflow of the stomach acid from the stomach to the esophagus. Nexium is indicated for the treatment of GERD or gastroesophageal reflux disease. Nexium is also used for a condition called Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. Nexium can be used to heal damage done to the esophagus from stomach acid and prevent gastric ulcers that are caused by certain bacteria. Nexium may be prescribed with certain antibiotics to treat bacteria called H Pylori. Ulcers may also develop from the use of Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as Advil, Motrin (ibuprofen) and Aleve (naproxen). Nexium should be taken exactly as prescribed by the doctor. Nexium is a delayed release capsule or it should never be crushed or chewed to provide maximum benefit. Nexium can be opened and put with applesauce if the capsules cannot be swallowed. Nexium is usually taken at least one hour before food generally in the morning with a full glass of water. Unfortunately, Nexium will not provide immediate relief of heartburn symptoms. Nexium may take a few days to provide relief from symptoms of GERD. Common side effects associated with Nexium include dizziness, headache, diarrhea, constipation and dry mouth. Other less common side effects occurring in less than 1% of patients treated with Nexium include muscle pain, rash, back pain, chest pain, malaise or feeling "" and flu-like symptoms. This is not a complete list of the side effects associated with Nexium. Kimberly Hotz, PharmD

Q: How long can you take Nexium without serious complications? Can it cause throat polyps?

Crib Mattress For Acid Reflux Simples Steps To (🔥 Foods That Can Help) | Crib Mattress For Acid Reflux Foods That Fight Hearbturnhow to Crib Mattress For Acid Reflux for A: Nexium (esomeprazole) is in a drug class called proton pump inhibitors. Nexium is used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Nexium is also used to prevent ulcers (sores in the lining of the stomach) in people who are taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). In combination with certain other medications, Nexium is used to treat and prevent the recurrence of stomach ulcers caused by H. pylori, a type of bacteria. Nexium is also used to treat conditions (e.g., Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome) in which the stomach makes too much acid. Nexium works be reducing acid production in the stomach. The safety of Nexium has been assessed in over 15,000 people in clinical trials around the world, according to its prescribing information. Over 2900 people were treated with Nexium in long-term studies -- up to 6 to 12 months. Generally, Nexium was well tolerated in short-term and long-term clinical trials. The most common side effects with Nexium are: headache, diarrhea, nausea, excessive gas, abdominal pain, constipation, and dry mouth. Atrophic gastritis has been reported in people treated long-term with omeprazole. Structurally, omperazole is a mirror image of Nexium. Atrophic gastritis is a condition where the normal glands of the stomach are decreased or absent; inflammation is present; and stomach cells are damaged. Atrophic gastritis is a precursor for stomach cancer. The cancer-causing potential of Nexium was assessed using studies with omeprazole in rats. Two 24-month studies looked at rats given doses of omeprazole 0.7 to 57 times a normal human dose. In these studies, rats that got omeprazole were more likely to get stomach tumors. Benign (non-cancerous) polyps or nodules of the gastrointestinal tract have been observed in people following treatment with Nexium. Nexium has been shown to be safe and effective over long periods of time to treat conditions in which the stomach makes too much acid (e.g., Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome). Long-term use of proton pump inhibitors has not been proven to cause stomach cancer in humans. New safety information has become available regarding the use of proton pump inhibitors. The safety information includes a possible increased risk of fractures of the hip, wrist and spine with the use of the medications. Studies have found that the greatest risk of fractures were in people who received high doses of proton pump inhibitors or in people who used the medications for 1 year or more. In general, the risks of taking a medication must be weighed against its health benefits. Derek Dore, PharmD

Q: Are there risks with long-term use of Nexium?

A: Nexium (esomeprazole) belongs to a class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors. PPIs decrease the amount of acid produced by the stomach. They are used to treat the symptoms of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), to heal erosive esophagitis, and to treat or prevent ulcers. PPIs have been around for over 20 years and have good safety record, even with long-term use. However, there are some precautions to consider. The major long-term side effects of PPIs is a vitamin B12 deficiency, and more rarely an iron deficiency. In addition to blocking the acid pumps in the stomach, PPIs also block the production of a protein in the stomach called intrinsic factor. Intrinsic factor is necessary for the proper absorption of vitamin B12. So, over many years, a deficiency may develop. This can be treated with vitamin B12 supplements, if advised by your doctor. Another risk with long-term use is a possible increased risk of fractures of the hip, wrist, and spine. Studies are not clear at this point about whether PPIs actually cause the increased risk or if it is due to some other factor. For now, tell your doctor if you develop any new bone pain. Your doctor is best able to guide your treatment decisions. Sarah Lewis, PharmD

Q: Does Nexium cause bone loss?

A: Nexium (esomeprazole) is a medication that is used to treat various conditions of the esophagus and stomach. It is classified in the class of medications called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Nexium works by disabling acid producing pumps in the stomach which lessens the amount of acid available to cause your symptoms. According to the prescribing information for Nexium, a precaution concerning the bones indicates, based on studies, that patients taking proton pump inhibitors may be at an increased risk for bone fracture. The increased risk appears to be highest for patients who take high doses of the medications for over one year. Consult with your physician to determine if the benefits of Nexium outweigh the risks for your particular situation. For more specific information, consult with your doctor or pharmacist for guidance based on your health status and current medications, particularly before taking any action. Lori Poulin, PharmD

Crib Mattress For Acid Reflux Diet Changes For (🔥 Heartburn) | Crib Mattress For Acid Reflux Home Remedies Forhow to Crib Mattress For Acid Reflux for Q: Will taking Nexium for years harm my stomach and maybe even cause stomach cancer?

A: Nexium (esomeprazole) belongs to a class of medication known as proton pump inhibitors. Nexium is used to treat symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and gastric ulcers. Current evidence does not support Nexium causing stomach cancer with long term use. Megan Uehara, PharmD

Q: I take Nexium every day in the morning. How will that interfere with absorption of any vitamins or supplements I take? Also, which calcium supplement is best for me? I now take Tums before bed and take a vitamin D tablet.

A: Nexium (esomeprazole) is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) which is used for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), hypersecretory conditions, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and for combination treatment of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Proton pump inhibitors decrease the amount of gastric acid that is released into the gastrointestinal system. This decrease in stomach acid can decrease the absorption of some vitamins and minerals. Calcium absorption can be decreased in patients taking acid lowering medications, such as Nexium. Tums are calcium carbonate which may have decreased absorption when administered concomitantly with Nexium. Calcium citrate (Citracal) is less likely to be affected by gastric acid levels, so it can be a better choice of calcium supplement for patients taking Nexium. Vitamin D also helps with calcium absorption. It is recommended to get 800 to 1000 IU of vitamin D daily. Patients who are on long-term treatment with proton pump inhibitors, such as Nexium, may have decreased absorption of vitamin B12 and supplementation with vitamin B12 may be necessary to avoid deficiency. Proton pump inhibitors, such as Nexium, may cause decreased absorption of iron. Your doctor can perform blood tests to ensure you are getting enough iron and vitamin B12 from your diet or supplements. Nexium should be taken on an empty stomach about one hour before breakfast or the first meal of the day. Swallow the Nexium capsule whole do not chew or crush. For those who have difficulty swallowing capsules, the capsule contents may be sprinkled on the 1 last update 07 Jul 2020 applesauce and swallowed immediately. Some of the most common side effects associated with Nexium are headache, gas, abdominal pain, upset stomach, nausea and dizziness. For more specific information, consult with your doctor or pharmacist for guidance based on your health status and current medications, particularly before taking any action. Laura Cable, PharmDA: Nexium (esomeprazole) is a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) which is used for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), hypersecretory conditions, such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and for combination treatment of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. Proton pump inhibitors decrease the amount of gastric acid that is released into the gastrointestinal system. This decrease in stomach acid can decrease the absorption of some vitamins and minerals. Calcium absorption can be decreased in patients taking acid lowering medications, such as Nexium. Tums are calcium carbonate which may have decreased absorption when administered concomitantly with Nexium. Calcium citrate (Citracal) is less likely to be affected by gastric acid levels, so it can be a better choice of calcium supplement for patients taking Nexium. Vitamin D also helps with calcium absorption. It is recommended to get 800 to 1000 IU of vitamin D daily. Patients who are on long-term treatment with proton pump inhibitors, such as Nexium, may have decreased absorption of vitamin B12 and supplementation with vitamin B12 may be necessary to avoid deficiency. Proton pump inhibitors, such as Nexium, may cause decreased absorption of iron. Your doctor can perform blood tests to ensure you are getting enough iron and vitamin B12 from your diet or supplements. Nexium should be taken on an empty stomach about one hour before breakfast or the first meal of the day. Swallow the Nexium capsule whole do not chew or crush. For those who have difficulty swallowing capsules, the capsule contents may be sprinkled on applesauce and swallowed immediately. Some of the most common side effects associated with Nexium are headache, gas, abdominal pain, upset stomach, nausea and dizziness. For more specific information, consult with your doctor or pharmacist for guidance based on your health status and current medications, particularly before taking any action. Laura Cable, PharmD

By Don Wall | Medically Reviewed by Sherry Brooks, MD

Latest Update: 2014-10-27
Copyright © 2014 Everyday Health Media, LLC

for 1 last update 07 Jul 2020
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